IGE is a meeting place for community groups that share our concerns about human rights and education for multicultural and religious awareness. We promote peaceful conflict resolution through training, workshops with youth and adults, and ongoing community discussion.

Rally for HEROES ACT Now!

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2020 10am-1pm
Lansing State Capitol Building, East Staircase
100 N Capitol Ave Lansing, MI 48933

CONTACT: Joshua Roskamp, Business Agent Local 26 email hidden; JavaScript is required 616.256.5070

Grand Rapids, MI, The stagehands union IATSE is rallying at the Michigan State Capitol to demand the immediate passage of the HEROES Act by the U.S. Senate. Unemployment is running out for most workers by July 25. Stagehands and other workers in the events and entertainment industry need the extension of unemployment benefits to pay their bills.

“The U.S. House of Representatives gave us hope by passing the HEROES Act”, said Josh Roskamp of IATSE Union Local 26. “Unfortunately the Republican dominated U.S. Senate, Mitch McConnell in particular, is stalling on giving us what we need. They say $600 is too much. They claim we don’t want to work, but they know full well that we cannot work!”

Roskamp continued, “We all saw the disaster of opening bars and restaurants in June. Now people are suffering and dying from COVID-19 at high rates. The events and entertainment industry is shut down until the COVID-19 pandemic is treated as a serious public health crisis. Most touring concerts and theater shows are not going back on the road until after March 2021. Millions of us are unemployed. We need to pay our bills and feed our families. This is our fight to live!”

Lindsey Katerberg of IATSE 26 said, “We are speaking out for non-union workers too. We are in this fight together. The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits those in our industry who cannot claim unemployment. It will continue to remain vital past the current expiration of July 31. We
need to raise base benefits at the state level in Michigan, to extend state unemployment, and set minimum wage for essential workers at $13/hour.”

Joe Miller of Local 38 in Detroit said, “Most of us have never filed for unemployment, never had to. You are looking at people that would rather be working. We don’t want to sit home. Now due to mishandling of the crisis, we do not see a particularly good way forward until next March, 2021.”

The rally brings together IATSE Locals of Michigan, the Michigan AFL-CIO, other union locals throughout Michigan, and non-union workers. (Tom Burke)

BLACK LIVES MATTER

A Monumental Challenge

During the protests in many cities throughout the United States, protestors have actively worked to pull down and break up monuments of confederate generals, slave owners, Christopher Columbus and more, because these statues are icons of this country’s history of colonialism, and racism. Black Americans and people of color can no longer wait for our country or its leaders to dismantle statues which glorify what has been an insulting and painful past for them.  For instance, Caroline Randell Williams, in a recent essay for the New York Times states, “The black people I come from were owned by the white people I come from. The white people I come from fought and died for their Lost Cause. And I ask you now, who dares to tell me to celebrate them? Who dares to ask me to accept their mounted pedestals?” Williams asks a good question.  If any conscientious individual takes a trip south to explore Civil War battles sites, the creepiness, yes, creepiness, of seeing statues of confederate generals smacks one in the face.

Recently, a rally at Mt Rushmore was held on the 4th of July by our current president who made a mockery of the protesters’ pain about monuments which honor confederate generals and slaveholders.  Media coverage, ironically, failed to show coverage or footage of the incomplete statue of Crazy Horse at Mt. Rushmore, nor did it remind viewers of the fact that the Badlands served as a sacred area to the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne people for centuries.  Hence, this provides another example of “forgetfulness” in the media’s coverage regarding the complex cultural and racial make-up of our country’s history, and current make-up.  

The way it should have always been in Detroit.

Courtney who is standing on top of where the bust of Christopher Columbus stood Is GTB Chippewa. Below on the left Teia is Anishinaabe and Mexican, Hadassah is LTBB Odawa and Joelle is Kauwetsà:ka/Cherokee. — with Joelle JoynerTeia McGaheyHadassah Greensky and Courtney Miller.

Several young women in Detroit sought to remind people of it by posing for a picture in full Native dress on a site that used to have a statue of Christopher Columbus and posting it on Facebook.Their action dares people to re-imagine their views of statues and of who ought to be honored by history and its citizens.  Recently, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, tweeted a similar idea: “People really need to ask themselves why their communities chose to erect statues to slaveholders instead of abolitionists.”  Sadly, respect for all people, and all cultures remains as a monumental challenge for the United States.  It was not until the 1990s that the State of Virginia honored and mounted a statue of Arthur Ashe, a Black tennis player, on Monument Row in Richmond, Virginia. As recently as July 5, 2020, a statue of Frederick Douglass was vandalized in Rochester, New York.  On July 5, 1852, Douglass gave his speech, “What to the Slave Is, the Fourth of July”.  As of the following Monday, police had not determined who might have vandalized the statue.  The vandalism of Douglass’ statue may point to a “payback” mentality or an underlying lack of respect.

From a larger perspective for the whole country, especially, for those who complain about honoring white culture the question still needs to be reflected upon in a more empathetic way for everyone. Why should one-sided honoring of white slave holders or confederate generals remain as the utmost value to United States history?  Perhaps, the state of Virginia could consider creating and mounting a statue of, Robert Pleasants, a wealthy white Quaker turned abolitionist who founded The Virginia Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes and Others, Unlawfully Held in Bondage, and Other Humane Purposes. This organization operated as an anti-slavery organization from 1790 to 1804. 

Also, if one wants to honor white culture, why not honor the Freedom Riders and mount a statue of them?  Or why not mount a statue of Lyndon B. Johnson, the president who helped pass and sign the Civil Rights Act? Perhaps, the honor needs to be placed on those who fought for equality and justice for all people.  The honor needs to be given to those who recognized the value of this country’s diversity, and all the gifts that many people of color along with white people have contributed to our country.  A re-imagining of the United States’ monuments continues to be this country’s challenge. -Cathy Cunningham, I.G.E Volunteer

Recognizing White Privilege

I have privilege as a white person because I can do all of these things without thinking twice:

I can go birding (#ChristianCooper)
I can go jogging (#AmaudArbery)
I can relax in the comfort of my own home (#BothemJean and #AtatianaJefferson)
I can ask for help after being in a car crash (#JonathanFerrell and #RenishaMcBride)
I can have a cellphone (#StephonClark)
I can leave a party to get to safety (#JordanEdwards)
I can play loud music (#JordanDavis)
I can sell CDs (#AltonSterling)
I can sleep (#AiyanaJones)
I can walk from the corner store (#MikeBrown)
I can play cops and robbers (#TamirRice)
I can go to church (#Charleston9)
I can walk home with Skittles (#TrayvonMartin)
I can hold a hair brush while leaving my own bachelor party (#SeanBell)
I can party on New Years (#OscarGrant)
I can get a normal traffic ticket (#SandraBland)
I can lawfully carry a weapon (#PhilandoCastile)
I can break down on a public road with car problems (#CoreyJones)
I can shop at Walmart (#JohnCrawford)
I can have a disabled vehicle (#TerrenceCrutcher)
I can read a book in my own car (#KeithScott)
I can be a 10yr old walking with our grandfather (#CliffordGlover)
I can decorate for a party (#ClaudeReese)
I can ask a cop a question (#RandyEvans)
I can cash a check in peace (#YvonneSmallwood)
I can take out my wallet (#AmadouDiallo)
I can run (#WalterScott)
I can breathe (#EricGarner)
I can live (#FreddieGray)
I CAN BE ARRESTED WITHOUT THE FEAR OF BEING MURDERED (#GeorgeFloyd)

It’s important to actually recognize that being able to do all these things is a privilege that everyone should have, regardless of the color of their skin.

*I copied and pasted this  … please do the same on facebook or elsewhere.

Words are not enough. Action is needed to dismantle the systemic racism that plagues our country and keeps resulting in the abuse and death of innocent people. I stand with my friends of color and will be an advocate and warrior to protect all humans. #BlackLivesMatter #Solidarity #SpeakUp

COMING EVENTS – I.G.E. Summer 2020

1. Sunday July 12, 2020 – IGE Board Meeting 2pm-4pm in the IGE Office or meet at a park.

2. Tuesday July 14, 2020- Sewing Circle from 2pm-7pm. Please sign up for this event. IGE can only do small group events. Sign up by emailing email hidden; JavaScript is required or call 1-773-220-0847. Must wear a mask.

3. WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 2020 Rally for HEROES ACT Now! 10am-1pm; Lansing State Capitol Building, East Staircase, 100 N Capitol Ave Lansing, MI 48933

4. Saturday August 1, 2020 Buttons making day. The office will be open 3pm-8pm for people to come in and make buttons. In light of all the protests and different issues this nation faces we thought it would be fun to make some buttons. Please sign up for this event, because of the pandemic we only do small group events 8-10 people for social distance. Must come with a mask on. Sign up for event by emailing email hidden; JavaScript is required. or call 1-773-220-084

Corinne Frances Carey
November 22, 1926 – May 19, 2020

 5. Corinne Carey Memorial Saturday August 22, 2020 at 2pm at Fountain Street Church.

6. Sunday, August 23, 2020 -Movie; Just Mercy! The movie will be from 2pm-5pm   with time for discussion. Please sign up for this movie event since we can only do small group events. Must wear a mask! IGE has purchased this movie if there is enough interest we may set a date for another showing. Sign up by emailing email hidden; JavaScript is required or call 1-773-220-0847. Must wear a mask.

7. Pending Event- Movie Ay Mariposa film in East Church parking lot late July- August 2020. It will be on Friday evening. IGE will co-host this event. More informationas will follow soon.

8. Pending Event- Film and discussion on Wangari Mathai. Wangari Maathai was Nobel Peace Prize Recipient, founder of the Green Belt Movement, Promoter of community and empowerment of Women in Kenya. Katie Villarie will host this event either in August or very early September . This will be held in the IGE office so sign up is necessary and must wear a mask. More information will follow soon




  



 

Pass Medicare for All—And More

We need Medicare for All. But much more must be done than just guaranteeing insurance and access. Health care alone does not mean health. by Kalena Thomhave  February 7, 2020


Will Copeland, an organizer with Breathe Free Detroit, has seen firsthand the effects of an incinerator on his community

Typically, when politicians discuss health policy, they’re talking about health care policy. The fixation on health care is obvious and understandable: We know that the United States spends more on health care per person than any other country in the world, even though it does not havethe best health care outcomes

Pharmaceutical companies, armed with patents, wield great power over prescription drug pricing and accessibility, and thus over our very lives. Families must often try raising money for their own medical care, through GoFundMe and similar crowdfunding platforms. Stories of people unable to receive medicine or a procedure due to cost are common; some of those people die.

We must change the structure of our health care system and guarantee health care as a human right. We need Medicare for All. But much more must be done than just guaranteeing insurance and access. Health care alone does not mean health.

In fact, researchers have found that only about 10 to 20 percent of health outcomes are related directly to care. The rest are due to what doctors call the “social determinants of health”—a mix of factors including housing stability, access to transportation, education, employment, food, and the built environment. 

In other words, “The social and structural context in which health care occurs is more important than health care itself,” Dr. Philip Alberti, senior director for health equity research and policy at the Association of American Medical Colleges, says in an interview. “That conversation—about the social influences of health—has largely been absent from our national dialogue.”  Social determinants related to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation affect how illness and disease are handled at every level, from initial screening to treatments.

Consider the city of Detroit, where an incinerator built in 1986 turned more than 3,000 tons of garbage into toxic ash each day while pumping pollutants into the surrounding neighborhood. Since 2013, according to the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, it was flagged for violating emissions standards 750 times. The community near the incinerator, which is majority low-income and majority people of color, has some of the highest rates of asthma in the state of Michigan. 

In 2015, the law center found, 66 percent of the waste came from the mostly white and very wealthy Oakland County, and just 19 percent from Wayne County, which includes the city of Detroit.

Will Copeland, an organizer with Breathe Free Detroit, the campaign that arose to shut down the incinerator, calls what was happening “an environmental justice issue in terms of other people throwing trash away [that] was going straight to the lungs of black Detroiters.” 

In spring of last year, the company that owns the incinerator, bowing to mounting public pressure, agreed to shut it down. It was a health win that had nothing to do with access to care or insurance.

Take, for another example, the shortage of safe and secure housing, which is necessary for physical, and psychological, well-being. Housing that contains lead paint or asbestos might literally make people sick, while not being able to afford housing can cause dangerous levels of stress. The people most likely to live in subpar housing or have trouble making rent are those with low incomes, and are disproportionately people of color. And often they live in communities segregated by racist redlining policies and biased zoning laws.

Social determinants related to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation affect how illness and disease are handled at every level, from initial screening to treatments. 

For example, people of color face higher rates of cancer yet are underrepresented in clinical trials. Black mothers have higher rates of maternal mortality and also higher rates of infant mortality, even when controlling for income. Health care for Native Americans is severely underfunded. Life expectancy varies greatly across the income divide—and recently, life expectancy has been falling in the United States, partly due to the opioid crisis.

Copeland tells me about a cousin of his who went to the emergency room—as many low-income people without insurance do when they’re sick—complaining of a severe headache. She was given Tylenol. She didn’t need Tylenol, he says. She had “some sort of brain embolism that wasn’t diagnosed.” The next day, she died. It is hard not to hear that story and wonder if she may have been treated differently had she been wealthy and white. Perhaps then, her pain might have occasioned an MRI.

 Another problem is that, in poorer areas, as in rural areas, there are simply fewer doctors. Some have even coined the term “health care deserts.” None of these problems are new: We’ve known for decades about health disparities based on social factors, yet little has been done to move the needle.

Even though poverty, housing, and education are all related to health policy, each still has its own department in the federal government. For health disparities, Alberti says what’s needed is a “community-engaged structural intervention” that includes education, housing, transportation, and economic development.

One way to look at this problem involves the upstream/downstream parable. Downstream care prioritizes giving equitable treatment when people need it. Upstream strategies aim to get at the root causes of health disparities across different groups—and swimming upstream is a little more difficult. 

Alberti says one positive upstream intervention he’s seen is the introduction of legal aid in medical care settings. For example, if a doctor screens an asthma patient and discovers that they live in a home with roaches (a trigger for asthma) and have an unresponsive slumlord, lawyers on the care team could intervene to force the landlord to correct the problem. 

Medical-legal partnerships can also ensure people get the benefits they’re entitled to. They “are about changing the context so the health care has a greater chance of succeeding,” Alberti says.

At the same time, Copeland says he’s heard stories about how some people who lived near the Detroit trash incinerator—who had asthma—were also asked about roaches, with no mention of the massive polluting structure down the street.

Dr. Nahiris M. Bahamón, a pediatrician at a community health clinic in Chicago and a board member of Physicians for a National Health Program, a group of more than 20,000 doctors and other health professionals, stresses the importance of clinics operating within a community, so that people can access health care where they live. Providers immersed in a community are better at understanding what services are available and what dangers are present (like a nearby facility pumping out tons of pollutants).  “A patient doesn’t suffer from an inequity,” Alberti says. “That patient’s community does.” Individual screening can only go so far.


And when people do go to the doctor, beyond the social determinants that are affecting their health, they still might find themselves up against the profit motive in health care. The cold bureaucracy of the health insurance system intensifies inequity and particularly hurts people with disabilities and chronic illnesses—those who need quality health care the most. 

Copeland lives with chronic illness and, given the poor treatment of people with disabilities, considers his illness part of his political identity. “People don’t realize how hard it is to do things when you’re sick,” he says. “If you’re sick and if you don’t turn in your paperwork by a certain time—your insurance will run out. And then you might get a bill for $100,000. “But if you’re sick, it can be unrealistic to expect you’re going to be on top of that—while you’re literally trying to figure out how to stay alive.”

All of the Democratic candidates for President are currently campaigning on promises of universal health care. Of course, the phrase “universal health care” is intentionally ambiguous and can mean any number of proposals. 

The Affordable Care Act passed during the Obama Administration was meant to be universal. And yet, in 2018, nearly twenty-eight million nonelderly adults were still living without health insurance, with approximately half citing cost as the reason. And “access” sometimes means getting stuck with thousands of dollars in deductibles, premiums, and out-of-pocket costs.

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a doctor and activist who ran for governor of Michigan in the 2018 primary, tells The Progressive that Medicare for All would be the most important piece of any progressive health agenda. “Medicare for All has to be the framework through which we understand a progressive approach to health care,” he says. “Health care and health, they’re not the same, but without being able to provide a secure, affordable, effective, and efficient direction on access to health care, it’s really hard to get to health.”

Physicians for a National Health Program has been calling for a single-payer system since its founding more than three decades ago. “What we have [now] is not a real health care system,” says Bahamón. “What we have is a fragmentation of a quasi-system that tries to provide health care, but the incentive is not to provide health care or make people healthier—the bottom line is making profits.”  Physicians for a National Health Program has been calling for a single-payer system since its founding more than three decades ago.

Medicare for All is illustrative of what a single-payer system could look like. The phrase is refreshingly simple—people understand that Medicare is government-provided insurance. But Medicare for All doesn’t actually mean Medicare in its current, complex form. All it means is that the government is the single provider of health insurance (hence “single-payer”). 

So yes, think Medicare, but in a form that is both better and cheaper, as copays and deductibles would be eliminated. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders can be credited with turning Medicare for All into a household phrase. After all, he “wrote the damn bill,” as he said during the Democratic debates in Detroit. Others including former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg have calledfor a watered-down version dubbed “Medicare for All Who Want It.”

Under the gold-standard system of Medicare for All, everybody—citizens and immigrants alike—would have access to basic health services and other essential services, like comprehensive mental health care, abortion care, drug rehabilitation, and dental care. With these bases covered, a Medicare for All system could finally focus on prevention. And additional investment would ensure that people can access doctors, dentists, eye doctors, and mental health providers, in both rural and urban communities.

 Bahamón describes seeing children with asthma get taken to the emergency room and ending up hospitalized. Asthma is manageable, yet these kids don’t have insurance, so they end up in the intensive care unit “when they could have just gone to their primary care physician every three months.”

Besides the medical field, there is space to consider the social determinants of health across policymaking. El-Sayed has termed the Green New Deal a “Public Health New Deal” because it would create jobs for people in poverty and eliminate the emissions that damage the lungs of mostly low-income people. After all, it is no coincidence that a trash incinerator was built next to some of the poorest neighborhoods in Detroit. 

There is no silver bullet to solve poverty and embedded systems of racism, classism, sexism, and ableism. But Medicare for All is a starting point to address health disparities and overarching inequality. So is gaining a broader understanding of what makes us sick and why. 

We must change the structure of our health care system and guarantee health care as a human right. We need Medicare for All. But much more must be done than just guaranteeing insurance and access. Health care alone does not mean health.

Consider the city of Detroit, where an incinerator built in 1986 turned more than 3,000 tons of garbage into toxic ash each day while pumping pollutants into the surrounding neighborhood. Since 2013, according to the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, it was flagged for violating emissions standards 750 times. The community near the incinerator, which is majority low-income and majority people of color, has some of the highest rates of asthma in the state of Michigan. 

In 2015, the law center found, 66 percent of the waste came from the mostly white and very wealthy Oakland County, and just 19 percent from Wayne County, which includes the city of Detroit. Will Copeland, an organizer with Breathe Free Detroit, the campaign that arose to shut down the incinerator, calls what was happening “an environmental justice issue in terms of other people throwing trash away [that] was going straight to the lungs of black Detroiters.”

In spring of last year, the company that owns the incinerator, bowing to mounting public pressure, agreed to shut it down. It was a health win that had nothing to do with access to care or insurance.

Take, for another example, the shortage of safe and secure housing, which is necessary for physical, and psychological, well-being. Housing that contains lead paint or asbestos might literally make people sick, while not being able to afford housing can cause dangerous levels of stress. The people most likely to live in subpar housing or have trouble making rent are those with low incomes, and are disproportionately people of color. And often they live in communities segregated by racist redlining policies and biased zoning laws.

Social determinants related to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation affect how illness and disease are handled at every level, from initial screening to treatments. 

For example, people of color face higher rates of cancer yet are underrepresented in clinical trials. Black mothers have higher rates of maternal mortality and also higher rates of infant mortality, even when controlling for income. Health care for Native Americans is severely underfunded. Life expectancy varies greatly across the income divide—and recently, life expectancy has been falling in the United States, partly due to the opioid crisis.

Copeland tells me about a cousin of his who went to the emergency room—as many low-income people without insurance do when they’re sick—complaining of a severe headache. She was given Tylenol. She didn’t need Tylenol, he says. She had “some sort of brain embolism that wasn’t diagnosed.” The next day, she died. It is hard not to hear that story and wonder if she may have been treated differently had she been wealthy and white. Perhaps then, her pain might have occasioned an MRI.

 Another problem is that, in poorer areas, as in rural areas, there are simply fewer doctors. Some have even coined the term “health care deserts.” None of these problems are new: We’ve known for decades about health disparities based on social factors, yet little has been done to move the needle.

Even though poverty, housing, and education are all related to health policy, each still has its own department in the federal government. For health disparities, Alberti says what’s needed is a “community-engaged structural intervention” that includes education, housing, transportation, and economic development.

One way to look at this problem involves the upstream/downstream parable. Downstream care prioritizes giving equitable treatment when people need it. Upstream strategies aim to get at the root causes of health disparities across different groups—and swimming upstream is a little more difficult. 

Alberti says one positive upstream intervention he’s seen is the introduction of legal aid in medical care settings. For example, if a doctor screens an asthma patient and discovers that they live in a home with roaches (a trigger for asthma) and have an unresponsive slumlord, lawyers on the care team could intervene to force the landlord to correct the problem. 

Medical-legal partnerships can also ensure people get the benefits they’re entitled to. They “are about changing the context so the health care has a greater chance of succeeding,” Alberti says.

At the same time, Copeland says he’s heard stories about how some people who lived near the Detroit trash incinerator—who had asthma—were also asked about roaches, with no mention of the massive polluting structure down the street.

Dr. Nahiris M. Bahamón, a pediatrician at a community health clinic in Chicago and a board member of Physicians for a National Health Program, a group of more than 20,000 doctors and other health professionals, stresses the importance of clinics operating within a community, so that people can access health care where they live. Providers immersed in a community are better at understanding what services are available and what dangers are present (like a nearby facility pumping out tons of pollutants). 

“A patient doesn’t suffer from an inequity,” Alberti says. “That patient’s community does.” Individual screening can only go so far. And when people do go to the doctor, beyond the social determinants that are affecting their health, they still might find themselves up against the profit motive in health care. The cold bureaucracy of the health insurance system intensifies inequity and particularly hurts people with disabilities and chronic illnesses—those who need quality health care the most. 

Copeland lives with chronic illness and, given the poor treatment of people with disabilities, considers his illness part of his political identity. “People don’t realize how hard it is to do things when you’re sick,” he says. “If you’re sick and if you don’t turn in your paperwork by a certain time—your insurance will run out. And then you might get a bill for $100,000. “But if you’re sick, it can be unrealistic to expect you’re going to be on top of that—while you’re literally trying to figure out how to stay alive.”

All of the Democratic candidates for President are currently campaigning on promises of universal health care. Of course, the phrase “universal health care” is intentionally ambiguous and can mean any number of proposals. 

The Affordable Care Act passed during the Obama Administration was meant to be universal. And yet, in 2018, nearly twenty-eight million nonelderly adults were still living without health insurance, with approximately half citing cost as the reason. And “access” sometimes means getting stuck with thousands of dollars in deductibles, premiums, and out-of-pocket costs.

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a doctor and activist who ran for governor of Michigan in the 2018 primary, tells The Progressive that Medicare for All would be the most important piece of any progressive health agenda.

“Medicare for All has to be the framework through which we understand a progressive approach to health care,” he says. “Health care and health, they’re not the same, but without being able to provide a secure, affordable, effective, and efficient direction on access to health care, it’s really hard to get to health.”

Physicians for a National Health Program has been calling for a single-payer system since its founding more than three decades ago. “What we have [now] is not a real health care system,” says Bahamón. “What we have is a fragmentation of a quasi-system that tries to provide health care, but the incentive is not to provide health care or make people healthier—the bottom line is making profits.”  Physicians for a National Health Program has been calling for a single-payer system since its founding more than three decades ago.

Medicare for All is illustrative of what a single-payer system could look like. The phrase is refreshingly simple—people understand that Medicare is government-provided insurance. But Medicare for All doesn’t actually mean Medicare in its current, complex form. All it means is that the government is the single provider of health insurance (hence “single-payer”). 

So yes, think Medicare, but in a form that is both better and cheaper, as copays and deductibles would be eliminated. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders can be credited with turning Medicare for All into a household phrase. After all, he “wrote the damn bill,” as he said during the Democratic debates in Detroit. Others including former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg have calledfor a watered-down version dubbed “Medicare for All Who Want It.”

Under the gold-standard system of Medicare for All, everybody—citizens and immigrants alike—would have access to basic health services and other essential services, like comprehensive mental health care, abortion care, drug rehabilitation, and dental care. With these bases covered, a Medicare for All system could finally focus on prevention. And additional investment would ensure that people can access doctors, dentists, eye doctors, and mental health providers, in both rural and urban communities.

 Bahamón describes seeing children with asthma get taken to the emergency room and ending up hospitalized. Asthma is manageable, yet these kids don’t have insurance, so they end up in the intensive care unit “when they could have just gone to their primary care physician every three months.”

Besides the medical field, there is space to consider the social determinants of health across policymaking. El-Sayed has termed the Green New Deal a “Public Health New Deal” because it would create jobs for people in poverty and eliminate the emissions that damage the lungs of mostly low-income people. After all, it is no coincidence that a trash incinerator was built next to some of the poorest neighborhoods in Detroit. 

There is no silver bullet to solve poverty and embedded systems of racism, classism, sexism, and ableism. But Medicare for All is a starting point to address health disparities and overarching inequality. So is gaining a broader understanding of what makes us sick and why.

-Kalena Thomhave is a writer covering poverty and inequality. She is currently based in Washington, D.C.


COMPLETE THE 2020 CENSUS


Online: MY2020CENSUS.GOV
Phone: 1-844-330-2020 Mail: in postage paid envelope
It is important so Grand Rapids receives maximum government funding
(roads, schools, hospitals)

There are NO citizenship questions!!!

FRANCES PERKINS

Frances Perkins, the first woman in the Cabinet
By Brenna Williams, CNN
Updated 11:22 AM ET, Thu March 2, 2017
Washington (CNN)

You might remember that Baby, the lead character of the film “Dirty Dancing,” was actually named Frances after the first woman in a president’s Cabinet. And Frances Perkins, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s labor secretary, certainly lived a life worthy of a namesake.
She was born Fannie Perkins in 1880, grew up in New England with her Republican family, attended Mount Holyoke — also the college the “Dirty Dancing” character was scheduled to attend — and majored in physics. According to the Frances Perkins Center, it was during an economics class her senior year that Perkins became passionate about labor.
After graduating, she worked with the poor in Illinois and Philadelphia. She also began studies in sociology and economics at the Wharton School before moving to New York and earning her master’s at Columbia.
What’s in a name? Ask Perkins. She not only changed her first name to Frances, she also went to court to defend her right to keep her maiden name after her marriage in 1913.
“My whole generation was, I suppose, the first generation that openly and actively asserted — at least some of us did — the separateness of women and their personal independence in the family relationship,” Perkins once said.
She lobbied for workplace safety in New York City and the standards she helped put in place set the bar for the rest of the country. Perkins was appointed to the state’s Industrial Commission, becoming the country’s highest paid woman in public office in the process, according to the Perkins Center.
When Roosevelt was elected governor of New York in 1928, she went to work as the state’s industrial commissioner. She continued to work for FDR when he was elected to the White House, becoming his labor secretary in 1933.
You’d think the chance at being the first woman in the Cabinet would be a good enough selling point. Not so for Perkins. According to the Perkins Center, she told Roosevelt she would only work for him in Washington if he would support things such as the 40-hour work week, unemployment programs, social security and child labor laws.
“I came to Washington to work for God, FDR, and the millions of forgotten, plain, common workingmen,” she said.
Perkins went on to become one of the architects of the Social Security Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act — major pillars of FDR’s New Deal. She served FDR until his death in 1945.
After retiring from government work, she taught at Cornell. Perkins died in 1965.

https://www.cnn.com/2017/03/02/politics/tbt-frances-perkins-womens-history-month/index.html
Also go to:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Perkins

Volunteers Welcome

1. Institute for Global Education is seeking volunteer opportunities. If you are interested in Peace & Justice issues, and passionate about people and developing more community. The Board of IGE is seeking individuals with good computer skills, add names to our database, send notices to people in data base about upcoming events, and send other information when needed. Board would like new volunteer to work in office at least one day a week, and be able to work independently, or other with other volunteer(s) from time to time.
2. Institute for Global Education is seeking volunteer to work with another volunteer to display and organize our fair trade items that we sale in office that IGE sales. These fair trade items represent Peace & Justice. This volunteer will work with the Treasurer and treasurer assistant to keep track of sales, keep a log, order new supply when need. This job can be done a once or twice month basis.
If Interested please email your information to email hidden; JavaScript is required or call the office 616-454-1642

Please donate to IGE

The Institute for Global Education stands for peace and justice here in Grand Rapids. Please make a donation to keep the Institute for Global Education moving forward.

Every penny goes towards stopping attacks on women, immigrants, unions, African Americans and other oppressed peoples. IGE marched at the airport against Muslim ban. IGE hosts the International Day of Peace where over 150 people participated. IGE supported our union bus drivers of ATU in the struggle to preserve pensions, keep health care benefits, and win a good contract here at the Rapid. IGE rallies and protests against putting children in cages, and taking babies from their parents at the border to ship them to Bethany Christian Services here in Grand Rapids. IGE supported the Young Lords 50 Years Conference in Chicago. IGE has participated in Day of the Dead, Mandela Day, and many other efforts. Together we can build strong movements.

Please donate now! We need your donation more than ever.

WORDS OF REMEMBRANCE

CAREY, CORINNE “At 93, I now look back on a life fulfilled,” Corinne Carey wrote shortly before her peaceful passing on May 19, 2020. “I was fortunate to be loved by George Carey, my husband of 62 years, and our four wonderful sons and their families,” she said. “When you go through this journey of life, you meet so many people that you truly love and cherish, beautiful people,” she wrote. Her life was full of people she met along the way, but she placed the greatest importance on her family, on being a mother to Pat, Mitch, Steve, and Keith, a grandmother to Mike, Megan, Brandon, and Lyn, and a great grandmother to Amelia, Maddy, and Atlas, a sister to JoAnn (nephews and nieces Merry, David Leslie, Randy, and Nancy) and to brother, Joel Douglas (nephews Warren and Bill). Born Corinne Frances Steury on November 22, 1926 in Grand Rapids, Michigan, she was the loving daughter of Joel Steury, a former member of the Mennonite community from Bern, Indiana and Rosemary Harris of Vestaberg, Michigan. Corinne led a long, healthy, active, and purposeful life that was guided by her belief in the good of people from all walks of life, the value of education, the importance of finding peaceful solutions to complex problems, and the need to preserve our earth for future generations. Corinne spent a lifetime turning her beliefs into actions. She was a woman ahead of her time, a mentor, a gifted and innovative teacher, a tireless social activist, and a person who had a passion for music, languages, travel, and, of course, family. Beyond her role as the matriarch of the Carey family, Corinne was a member of Fountain Street Church since 1948 and sang in the choir there for most of the 72 years she was a member. She found a second home at Fountain Street, drawn to the messages of hope and peace espoused by the church. For years, she set up a table after church services where she distributed literature about the importance of a nuclear free world and protecting our environment, and talked to everyone about what they could do to promote an environmentally safe Michigan. Long before anyone heard about reducing carbon footprints, Corinne was taking steps to reduce hers and encouraging others to do so. She practiced what she preached. – every single day. On Monday afternoons, for many years, she rallied with a local peace group on the corner of Division and Fulton in downtown Grand Rapids, advocating for issues of peace, global justice, and a nuclear-free world. Corinne returned to college in her early forties and, in 1967, became a member of the first graduating class at Grand Valley State University where she received a teaching degree. She taught fourth, fifth, and sixth grades at Coit School for the next 15 years. Corinne wanted students from Coit’s economically depressed neighborhood to have pride in their community and in themselves. Toward that end, she organized and trained her students to lead kids in the lower grades on historical tours of the Coit neighborhood. They learned about the historic buildings and cobblestone streets around their school, as well as the origins of the neighborhood and its place in the history of Grand Rapids. For years after they graduated, students returned to her to say how important she had been in their lives. When the school board proposed razing the building in the 1990s, it was Corinne who joined the fight to save it, eventually winning the battle. Coit School, now 140 years old, continues as a public school today. Once retired from teaching, Corinne single handedly produced a series called Speaking Out on Grand Rapids Television and ran it for 20 years. She also grew increasingly interested in the environmental threat of nuclear power plants and joined the Don’t Waste Michigan movement. In her late 60s, she walked 450 miles with the Michigan Peace March to protest against nuclear power plants and to fight for peace and justice around the world. For 35 years, she was an active member of the Institute for Global Education (IGE), an organization devoted to peaceful conflict resolution, human rights, and multicultural and religious awareness. Upon hearing of Corinne’s passing, IGE released a statement saying that “…we have lost a jewel…Her enthusiasm and generous nature were a gift to everyone who was ever near her.” At 91, Corinne joined the Michigan League of Conservation Voters as a volunteer where she spent her volunteer days calling Michiganders, encouraging them to vote for representatives who would stop rollbacks of critical environmental protections and work toward making Michigan a model and leader in conservation. She also tutored at Coit School for years after her retirement. She taught for a summer in Nepal and ended up sponsoring one of her students, Ram Bdr Khadka, for the following 12 years. She encouraged his studies and mentored him from a child to a young man. Ram is now completing college and teaching elementary school kids, as well as getting involved in his community – his path, in part, guided by Corinne. In letters he wrote to her over the years, he affectionately referred to her as “Grandma.” Amid all of her political and environmental activities, Corinne always put her family first and found time to be a grandmother, doing things like baking and decorating gingerbread houses, knitting nose warmers, crocheting, playing the piano, and always imparting knowledge to her grandkids, exposing them to new experiences to broaden their horizons. She was a teacher in every sense of the word – both in and out of the classroom. Whether she was teaching or volunteering or marching, or sharing time with her family, Corinne’s life was life in motion – always devoted to actions that would make the world a better place and our future brighter. When she summed up her motivations for a life of selfless activism, she said only: “It’s the least I can do for my boys and my family’s future.” If Corinne could leave us with just one word, a word to remember her by, a word that we’ve all heard her say many times, it would be what she said with every goodbye: “Onward!” Corinne is preceded in death by her parents, Joel and Rosemary Steury, her husband, George Carey, siblings JoAnn and Doug, and nephew Warren Steury. She leaves behind her four sons, Pat Carey (Sue), Mitch Carey (Nancy), Steve Carey (Jan), and Keith Carey, grandchildren Mike Carey (Amy), Megan Dupuy (Bert), Brandon Carey, and Lyn Rose Carter (Paul), and great grandchildren Amelia Dupuy, Maddy Dupuy, and Atlas Carter. She also leaves behind many beloved nieces and nephews and their children. Donations may be made in Corinne’s name to Fountain Street Church (24 Fountain St NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503) and/or to the Institute for Global Education (1118 Wealthy St SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49506) A memorial for Corinne will be held at Fountain Street Church on August 8, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. (Due to the current pandemic crisis, this date may change. Please check the following website for updates closer to the date of the service: (www.memorialalternatives.com).

Grand Rapids African American Museum and Archives (GRAAMA)

http://www.graama.org

GRAAMA 87 Monroe Center, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 Hours Opened: Tues-Sat 12-5pm 616-540- 2943

EXHIBITS
June- September Local Quilts from “ Changing America; The Underground Railroad and March on Washington”  &
“ City of Hope”: Resurrection City and 1968 Poor People Campaign Nergo League Baseball 


POP-EVENTS June-September Rotating exhibits honoring local activist including Carl Smith, Cleo Cross, the Northeast 4, Robert F. Williams, Emory Douglas, Phyllis Scott, the Bergmans and Sonya Hughs.
Speakers June- September Local Activist, such as Dr. Emmett Bolden and Dr. Eugene Alston . They will recount their personal accounts in the many activist moments within Grand Rapids.